How to Celebrate Parties More Eco-Friendly?


We reached out to some of our favorite eco-conscious accounts and asked them for their tips, tricks, advice, and recommendations on how to throw the best party, all while remaining kind to the planet.


A party platter of food for an eco-friendly party.

Here’s what the experts had to say.



Sarah Robertson-Barnes – Sustainable in the Suburbs


Holidays and celebrations can present challenges to any eco-friendly lifestyle, particularly when it comes to a family with other expectations and older children who are exposed to peers with different experiences. Leading by example is vital, including giving gifts with intention and showing that the meaning of celebrations goes beyond physical items.


A group of friends cheering at a party

Consider giving secondhand or homemade gifts. You can typically find terrific, high-quality items on eBay or Facebook Marketplace. Better yet, give the gift of an experience such as an art class or tickets to a show. Whatever you choose, opt for recyclable or reusable wrapping such as craft paper, cloth bags, or a scarf.


If you are also throwing a party, remember that people are simply there to celebrate. Have your party at home with reusable decorations and use your own dishes to reduce trash significantly. Activities can be as simple as crafts using recyclable items or playing outside. Finally, give low waste goody bags (such as a seed packet or jar of bulk candy) or none at all. Celebrate according to your values, and others will celebrate with you.


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Cadie Piecuch – Naturally Cadie


Reuse as much as you can! If it's for smaller gatherings, use your own cutlery, fabric napkins, plates, and cups vs. disposable, to wash and use again and again. For larger? You can always rent reusable dinnerware from local companies!


Wrapping an eco-friendly gift

Here are some of my go-to green gifting tips.

You could gift an experience vs. something material — it's always a good idea to try something new! Or you can make sure you purchase mindfully something that the person you're shopping for actually wants or needs. Or something you know they would enjoy! No use in wasting items or your hard-earned money, for that matter.

Always try to purchase from local vendors and support small businesses. Especially during these difficult times, we need to support local businesses to help our communities remain fresh and vibrant.


Did you know that most traditional wrapping paper isn't recyclable!? So if you are wrapping a gift, be sure to use eco-materials such as reusable cloths or bags, recycled kraft paper, and string. It's even fun to add a bit of nature like twigs, flowers, or sticks for some flare without harming the environment!

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Isabel Mack – Party Kit Network


Avoiding unnecessary waste is the key to a more eco-friendly celebration. As a rule, this means avoiding single-use items.


reusable dishes and cutlery
Source: Party Kit Network

One of the easiest eco-friendly switches is to ditch disposable plates in favor of reusable ones. If you don't already have enough plates to cater to your guests, ask to borrow from a neighbor or friend, or consider hiring plates and dishes just for the party.


One option is to borrow a party kit from the growing network of kits available to hire for celebrations. A party kit is a box with reusable plates, cups, and more. Run by people within the local community, party kits help to make reusable tableware more accessible.


Decorations is another area where it's possible to find alternatives to traditional single-use decorations such as balloons. There are some really great eco-friendly alternatives such as bunting, paper fans, pom-pom garlands, and more. Many decorations can be made with things you may already have, such as using old clothing to make rag-tie bunting. It is possible to have a colorful party with reusable decorations that can be shared and used repeatedly.

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Wendy Graham – Moral Fibres


My top tip for a zero-waste party is to either use what you have or borrow from others. Short on plates or cutlery, for example? Rather than buying disposable plates and cutlery, use the plates and cutlery you have. No one minds if it doesn't match.


second hand cutlery and dishes.

And if you are still short, ask a friend if they can bring along a few plates that you can then wash and return to them — throwing a bigger bash? Look for local companies that rent out plates, glasses, cutlery, etc.


This approach is planet-friendly and doesn't generate any waste.

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Would you like more information on how VidDay is a zero-waste gifting option or our sustainability efforts (including our partnership with One Tree Planted) — send us an email.


We’d be happy to talk. ♥